The Shape of the Sky

“The Shape of the Sky” will be on view in the Elberson Fine Arts Center at Salem College in Winston-Salem, NC from August 27th to October 5th.The opening reception takes place on Friday September 7th, from 6:00-8:00 PM and is free and open to the public.

This video shows part of the process of working on the painting “Pilot Mountain 4.” Read on for the press release.

The Shape of the Sky: Recent paintings by Jessica Singerman at the Velma Mason Davis Gallery, Elberson Fine Arts Center, Salem College, August 27 – October 5, 2018

Award-winning painter and recipient of a 2018 Duke Energy Regional Artist Project Grant, Jessica Singerman announces her exhibit of paintings entitled THE SHAPE OF THE SKY, opening at the Velma Mason Davis Gallery, Elberson Fine Arts Center, Salem College on August 27th and continuing through October 5th. The opening reception takes place on Friday September 7th, from 6:00-8:00 PM.

Singerman is inspired by the poetry of nature: color and light in the landscape, seasons, and the passing of time. The series of paintings “Forces of Nature” is inspired by the strength of nature and the power of the outdoors. “Pilot Mountain” is a series of works inspired by a snowy winter hike in Pilot Mountain State Park in North Carolina.

Says Singerman of her “Pilot Mountain” paintings, “During our hike I was struck by the contrast between the stark lines of the trees against the softer shapes of rock, patches of snow and sky, so I took some photos as we walked. These photos were a jumping off point for this series, and I enjoyed the challenge of finding a balance between representation and abstraction.”

Of her “Forces of Nature” paintings, Singerman says, “I love the outdoors and am fascinated with the natural world and the intricacies of life. I hope these paintings will inspire you and bring you deep contentment.”

Arts writer Michael Solender wrote in Lake Norman Magazine, “Singerman’s approach to her work and her outlook on life brings a broad perspective. Her work offers explosions of color, form and light conjuring imagery of motion and depth.”

About the artist: Born in Bangor, Maine in 1980, Jessica Singerman lived alternatively in France and the United States during her early life. Singerman earned her BA with Highest Honors in 2002 from the College of William & Mary, Virginia, and her Masters of Fine Arts in 2004 from the University of Delaware while on a fellowship. Her watercolors are the subject of a book published in 2017, Little Watercolor Squares, and her award-winning paintings and drawings are exhibited and collected internationally.

In previous lives, Singerman taught yoga and worked as a guide leading epic bicycle tours all over Europe, Central America, and Australia. She is obsessed with bikes, loves to ride, sometimes races, and lives and works in Winston-Salem, North Carolina.

VELMA MASON DAVIS GALLERY, ELBERSON FINE ARTS CENTER, SALEM COLLEGE, including THE SHAPE OF THE SKY, by Jessica Singerman, August 27 – October 5. Opening reception Friday September 7, 6:00 – 8:00 PM.

601 S. Church Street, Winston-Salem, NC 27101, www.salem.edu/about/fine-arts-center, 336.721.2600

Five percent of the sales of Singerman’s works are donated to Yadkin Riverkeeper, a local non-profit that “seeks to respect, protect and improve the Yadkin Pee Dee River Basin through education, advocacy and action.”

Working on a painting

This is a timelapse video of me working on an abstract painting. This is a painting I have worked on for 5 years on and off, and I had just scraped off some paint before going back into it. It was nearly finished by the end of the video.

Pennsylvania Dutch Country Paintings

I spent a week in July in Pennsylvania Dutch Country. Each morning, I woke up early and painted the landscape of fields, farmland, forests, earth, and sky.

Although you may be more familiar with my abstract work, painting and drawing from life are an important part of my practice as an artist. Observing the effects of light on color and shape, and translating that into paint keeps my eyes and hand sharp. These images work themselves into my abstract pieces as well – a memory of a particular color or shadow or shape – all these elements play into my abstract paintings.

Each 7.5 x 10.75 inch painting is oil on wood panel and is available for $550 including shipping to the US. $650 includes shipping anywhere else in the world.

If you’d like to purchase one of these paintings for your collection or to share with a friend, click on the images below to visit the gallery shop.

“Wednesday Morning, Valley Road”, oil on wood panel, 7.5 x 10.75 inches, 2018 – This painting is SOLD
“Tuesday Morning, Roush Road”, oil on wood panel, 7.5 x 10.75 inches, 2018
“Thursday Morning, Beagle Road”, oil on wood panel, 7.5 x 10.75 inches, 2018
“Sunday Morning, Beagle Road”, oil on wood panel, 7.5 x 10.75 inches, 2018
“Monday Morning, Roush Road”, oil on wood panel, 7.5 x 10.75 inches, 2018
“Saturday Morning, Meadow Lane”, oil on wood panel, 7.5 x 10.75 inches, 2018
“Friday Morning, Deodate and Old Hershey”, oil on wood panel, 7.5 x 10.75 inches, 2018

 

 

Packing my plein air painting kit

Enjoy this little stop motion video showing all the materials I bring with me for oil painting on the road. This is my pochade box, or a minimalist’s kit for painting when traveling.

Want to learn more about how to make a pochade box? Check out this blog post where I share a brief history of these little portable painting kits, how I made mine, and what I take with me on the road.

Plein Air Painting Project

Antiquity Hill 2, oil on panel, 7.5 x 10.75 inches

 

Next week I am headed to Pennsylvania Dutch Country for a week with family. During that time I will make a painting of the landscape each day. Plein Air painting, or translated from French, simply painting outside, was popularized by the 19th century Impressionists and made possible by advances in painting technology such as paint in tubes. Before this, artists ground their paint by hand and stored them in little sacks made of pig bladders!

Although you may be more familiar with my abstract work, painting and drawing from life are an important part of my practice as an artist. Observing the effects of light on color and shape, and translating that into paint keeps my eyes and hand sharp. These images work themselves into my abstract pieces as well – a memory of a particular color or shadow or shape – all these elements play into my abstract paintings.

I am offering each of these plein air paintings during a pre-sale this week July 2-8.



 

Each of these five artworks will be painted with oil on wood panel, 7.5 x 10.75 inches, and priced at $550. This will include taxes and free shipping to anywhere in the world. Because of oil paint’s long drying time, these paintings will be shipped in September. This way your painting will arrive in tip-top condition.

Note: After this pre-order period, shipping outside of the United States will add $100 to the price of these paintings.

If you know someone who may be interested in claiming one of these special paintings, please share this post with them.

What to see how I keep painting on the road? Here’s a little video I made to share my kit for painting in the outdoors. It’s a minimalist’s setup for oil painting when you have little space.

The Story of Antiquity Hill
I painted Antiquity Hill 2, the painting at the top of this post, in 2014. I used to ride my bike to a nearby field to paint there. It was a vast space and there were just a few houses on the land at first. I’m sure you can guess what happened as time went on. The tree line receded, more houses were built, and eventually a shopping center went up. The field disappeared. This painting is a love letter to that field.

Antiquity Hill 2 is available for purchase below:


Choose a shipping option



Plein Air Painting Project

Antiquity Hill 2, oil on panel, 7.5 x 10.75 inches

 

In a few weeks I will head up to Pennsylvania Dutch Country for a week with family. During that time I plan to make a painting of the landscape each day. Plein Air painting, or translated from French, simply painting outside, was popularized by the 19th century Impressionists and made possible by advances in painting technology such as paint in tubes. Before this, artists ground their paint by hand and stored them in little sacks made of pig bladders!

Although you may be more familiar with my abstract work, painting and drawing from life are an important part of my practice as an artist. Observing the effects of light on color and shape, and translating that into paint keeps my eyes and hand sharp. These images work themselves into my abstract pieces as well – a memory of a particular color or shadow or shape – all these elements play into my abstract paintings.

As a special offer for subscribers of my Insider’s List, I am offering each of these plein air paintings during a pre-sale on June 25-July 1.

If you aren’t yet part of this group of Insiders, sign up here!

Each of these five artworks will be painted with oil on wood panel, 7.5 x 10.75 inches, and priced at $550. This will include taxes and free shipping to anywhere in the world. Because of oil paint’s long drying time, these paintings will be shipped in September. This way your painting will arrive in tip-top condition.

If you know someone who may be interested in claiming one of these special paintings, please share this message with them, and invite them to sign up to the Insider’s List.

And if you’re already on the Insider’s List, be on the lookout for a message from me on June 25th announcing the start of the pre-sale. These will be available to subscribers for one week before they go on sale to the rest of the world.

The Story of Antiquity Hill
I painted Antiquity Hill 2, the painting at the top of this post, in 2014. I used to ride my bike to a nearby field to paint there. It was a vast space and there were just a few houses on the land at first. I’m sure you can guess what happened as time went on. The tree line receded, more houses were built, and eventually a shopping center went up. The field disappeared. This painting is a love letter to that field.

Antiquity Hill 2 is available for purchase below:


Choose a shipping option



Art helps build community connectedness

A few weeks ago Michael J. Solender interviewed me for the Duke Energy Illumination blog. We had a nice chat, talking about why supporting the arts is important and how it improves our communities. The interview is now live. Thank you Michael. Read the story below or on the Illumination blog.

Jessica Singerman in the studio
Photo Credit: Tim Bowman

Support for artists helps build creative spirit

Duke Energy’s arts grants contribute to quality of life in smaller North Carolina towns

Abstract landscape painter Jessica Singerman doesn’t live in a major art market like New York or London, so taking advantage of the digital universe helps bring her work to a wide audience.

She is developing her website to include digital video components to help demystify the creation process by sharing her approach and inspiration behind her art. That project got a boost with a 2018 Duke Energy Regional Artist Grant. The company, through the Arts Council of Winston-Salem and Forsyth County, awarded nearly $25,000 to 14 area artists.

“Receiving the grant and seeing the support for artists, especially in smaller communities, demonstrate that our work is valued,” said Singerman of Winston-Salem, N.C. “Artists, especially in smaller communities, don’t have many opportunities like this, it means a lot.”

For artists working in music, film, literature, dance, visual art and craft and living in Davidson, Davie, Forsyth, Stokes, Surry, and Yadkin counties in North Carolina, the regional artist grant program is making an impact. The company has given grants to arts councils in a number of other counties in the state, often supporting arts in schools.

“Investments in the arts are what make living in our communities more interesting and are a wonderful expression of the people that live in those communities,” said Amy Strecker of the Duke Energy Foundation. “One of the things that is great about funding arts programs in smaller communities is that there are not as many funding options as in some of our urban centers. This is a great way for us to continue to support artists who might have fewer opportunities available to them.”

The entire community benefits from a thriving arts culture, said Catherine Heitz New, deputy director of the Arts Council. Economic development, tourism and educational rewards are byproducts of creative entrepreneurs contributing to the fabric of cultural life in the region.

“These grants give artists the space, time and resources to experiment and develop ideas that become great art,” she said. “This is so important for artists and creative entrepreneurs and essential for us in fulfilling our reputation because they are the lifeblood of the cultural ecosystem.

“A vibrant arts culture is a significant driver behind the ability to recruit and retain talent into the community. From the standpoint of education, arts programing is an essential part of what sets Forsyth County schools apart and has allowed them to become a leader in many ways with regards to arts education.”

Jimmy Flythe, Duke Energy’s west region community relations manager, sees the difference the support can make.

“When companies look to move here and are evaluating our community,” Flythe said, “it’s important to show them the vibrancy and strong quality of life in our area. The arts are definitely a large part of that.”

For Singerman, “Art helps build community connectedness. The process of creation is not linear. Without a defined end goal of getting something done, art gives people the opportunity to dream and experience the joy associated with that. Through exploration and conversation, art can help create empathy and understanding of others. It’s wonderful to be part of that broader discussion.”

Artist Talk: Demystifying Abstraction

On Wednesday April 25th, the Charlotte Millennial Art Program invited me to speak at Elder Gallery of Contemporary Art in Charlotte, NC. In this lecture, “Demystifying Abstraction,” I share a brief history of abstraction, talk about my painting process, inspiration, life as an artist, and why making art matters. The talk is followed by a Q&A session where we go into more detail about my education, philosophy, and where art comes from.

Morning Walks

I walk in the mornings after bringing Noah to school. I look, listen, breathe. I take in the shapes of light and shadow, the myriad greens, the pinks, violets, reds, birdsong, my favorite wind chime. I get as close as I can to birds before they fly away, try to get close enough to see their tiny chests moving with their breath. I look up at the big sky, taking in the sunlight-filled blues, the racing clouds, or the broad plush grays. My morning walks are one of my favorite parts of my day. Moving, feeling the cold or warm air on my face, thinking, sometimes even figuring things out! I take the light, shapes, colors, sounds, smells, back to my studio. I’ll keep trying to filter all of these experiences into my painting.

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